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Ingredients

Chromium. Are You Getting Enough?

chromium

You may have never heard of it, yet chromium is an important trace mineral that’s needed in the diet, in small amounts, to protect against some of society’s most common diseases.

Western diets lacking from this naturally occurring ingredient may be more likely to face life-threatening conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

It’s society’s reliance on modern food processing methods, as well as industrialised agricultural methods, that have resulted in a widespread chromium deficiency, an important trace mineral that enhances insulin performance—a hormone critical for metabolism as well as carbohydrate, protein and fat storage within the body.

However, our addiction to fast-paced living and the stress that fuels it can also be to blame for the body’s chromium depletion, say many health industry experts, who agree that in such acidic conditions, this also sets up the body to become insulin resistant, where cells don’t respond to insulin. This leads to elevated blood levels of insulin and glucose, leading to disease.

Yet before topping up, it’s important to know that it’s found in two forms: one, which is biologically active and found in food (chromium 3+) and a toxic version, which comes from industrial pollution (chromium 6+).

Beneficial Chromium Foods

It’s in properly grown organic foods where we find the most beneficial amounts, albeit small. Non-genetically modified whole grains, some fruits, vegetables and spices have been found to offer the most benefits. Simple sugar foods containing sucrose and fructose are much lower in the mineral.

Those who suffer with acne, glaucoma, high cholesterol, high triglyceride, hypoglycaemia, obesity, psoriasis and Type 2 Diabetes may directly benefit from adding chromium into their daily meal plan.

Organic broccoli, grapes, potatoes, garlic, basil, orange juice, whole wheat bread (sprouted if possible with no preservatives or additives), red wine, apples, bananas, and green beans have been found to have the highest amounts.

According to the National Academy of Sciences, the estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intake range for the mineral is between 50 and 200mcg for adults.

Those who suffer with acne, glaucoma, high cholesterol, high triglyceride, hypoglycaemia, obesity, psoriasis and Type 2 Diabetes may directly benefit from adding chromium into their daily meal plan.

How Much is Too Much?

The Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences found, in 2001, that excessive intake of chromium-rich foods have no side effects. However, it warned that those with liver or kidney disease might more readily experience adverse reactions to excessive chromium intake. Therefore, it’s important to seek health advice from a trusted practitioner before supplementing chromium into the diet.

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