Review: Schkinny Maninny Low Fruit Juice & Soup Cleanse

To everything there is a season, and with Autumn in full swing I decided to detox to ward off winter bugs.

The Schkinny Maninny Low Fruit Juice & Soup Cleanse contains three juices and two soups, sweetened only by the final “course”: The Sleep Well smoothie made of almonds, brazil nuts, water, cinnamon and Medjool dates.

True to its name, Sleep Well kicked off a blissful night’s sleep and I woke up feeling refreshed and–within a few days–back in balance.

While this cleanse is ranked “very challenging”, it was a gourmet extravaganza after the week-long detox I did after a bad case of food poisoning. That diet saw me give up caffeine, sugar and dairy and not combine proteins and carbohydrates. I even (elegantly) ate the filing out of a vol-au-vent at an event.

While all the combinations are delicious, my favourite was the creamy “ButterSeed Soup”, made of pumpkin, butterbeans, parsley, cumin, coriander and onion. 

What it is

Schkinny Maninny offers six varieties of detox programs, “designed to boost immunity, kick start a healthier eating and provide the body with the best nourishment” according to Catherine Craig, company founder and director.

“Despite a love of exercise and a perpetually healthy diet, things weren’t peachy. Even a dedicated gluten and caffeine free diet, with tonnes of vegies, wholegrain foods couldn’t produce a perfect cellulite free, unbloated, jumping out of bed disposition every day. So I started searching,” Catherine says. “Deciding to trial another commercially available ‘detox’ to see if this would be the answer, I was dismayed to discover that whilst it did eventually produce good results, its extreme deprivation, repetitiveness and lack of actual good healthy vitamins and minerals as well as general nutrition can’t be good for you. Whilst most of us don’t worship at the “body is a temple” altar, I thought there had to be another option available for everyday people.”

How much:

$59 AUD per day, plus delivery. Delivered fresh in the mornings in a custom-designed Esky, to Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane.

How do the cleanses work?

Catherine says the cleanses are based on fresh raw fruit and vegetable juices, made fresh daily. She says the liquid diet allows the digestive system to rest and instead use the energy to help the body detoxify itself. In terms of nutrients, she says: “Your body will get the equivalent of up to 6kg of fruits and vegetables each day of your cleanse.”

While this cleanse is ranked “very challenging”, it was a gourmet extravaganza after the week-long detox I did after a bad case of food poisoning.

“Your body will get the equivalent of up to 6kg of fruits and vegetables each day of your cleanse,” she says.

Who are they aimed at?

Catherine recommends them for people looking for a healthy restart to their diet and lifestyle; to boost their immunity levels; and for a short term break from their regular eating/drinking patterns.

For more information about the detox programs and Schkinny Maninny, see  www.schkinnymaninny.com.au

I’ve you’ve tried a cleanse and experienced great results, we’d love to hear about it, so please share in the comments!

schkinny_maninny

BUSINESS ON YOUR TERMS
Do you have a dream to work to your own schedule, with no boss to answer to? Do you love natural beauty and holistic health? Join a passionate team of women who are making a difference at home, in their community and globally. Enter your details to receive further info.
Your email privacy is respected, always.
Written By

Maha began her career as a news reporter in Melbourne, where she was born. After a good grounding at the Herald Sun newspaper, freelance work took her to Sydney and that has been her base since 1994. She has a passion for issues that affect society and, in particular, women. She was involved with the launch of marie claire in Australia, contributing to early editions. Her heritage is Lebanese and she has worked in Lebanon and the Gulf, while connecting with family and practising her rather poor Arabic. After a bout of anaemia in 1997, she switched to alternative therapies and took up yoga. Over the past decade, she has treated her own food intolerances and shifted to an organic and gluten-free diet. Maha calls herself “a hippie in the wrong decade” due to her environmental awareness, community involvement, and generally wanting the world to be a better place.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *